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Share your insight, inspire the next step


Led by Michiel van der Vaart and Jan Paul Grollé

We want to provide researchers with an intuitive tool to concisely formulate why a publication is interesting, who it is interesting for, and what the next step should be.

Led by Michiel van der Vaart and Jan Paul Grollé

Aim

The academic community is frequently sharing scientific publications via Twitter and other social media. However, researchers generally fail to specify why we should take notice of a certain publication, who the intended audience is for the new finding, or what the next step would be to advance the knowledge. We want to provide researchers with an intuitive tool to concisely formulate why a publication is interesting, who it is interesting for, and what the next step should be. These insights are shared in a tweet directed at a target audience specified via #hashtags to facilitate knowledge dissemination and utilisation. All shared insights and the responses they spark are stored in an openly available database to generate a thematic research agenda that advances scientific progress by combining the wisdom of diverse crowds.

Work at the Sprint

We envision the work during the Sprint to be divided into three parts:

  1. Design and develop a light-weight user interface that prompts people to summarise the most important finding of a paper in one sentence, formulate the next step for this research in one sentence, and indicate the target audience by adding hashtags
  2. Test this interface by asking researchers at the Sprint to use it to send a tweet about a publication. We hope that this feedback will validate our preliminary results that tweeting about publications in a more insightful way is a ‘quick-win’
  3. Design and develop the software that captures these tweets (and potentially the replies they generate) and stores them in an openly available database. This would generate a ‘crowd-sourced research agenda’ of suggested next steps

We are looking for…

Contributors with expertise in software development, UX and database infrastructure; researchers to test the application by sending a tweet about a publication; and communication to the broader research community to convince them to tweet about publications in an insightful way.